Tim Fawcett
Texts and Artworks

Tim Fawcett is a painter based in the United Kingdom, originally from Cambridge, and studied Fine Art at Sunderland and Cambridge with PGCE training at Brighton where he has lived and worked for over 20 years.


Artist Statement:


The need to make art is driven by the artist's need to express emotion in a society which tends to show a cheerful façade devoid of pain. It also aims to challenge the false optimism of commercial society.


Tim Fawcett - Painter - Galerie d'art de Francony


Inspiration takes many forms: A fascination with how western society represents its self, outwardly through photographic saturation, on social media. By examining similarities with the glossy media representation, of modern culture, and aspiring celebrity, I am interested in how this affects society’s view of its self, especially its negative impact on the human condition.


The Artist's painting process is normally an indirect and fluid “journey”, relying on instinct and spontaneity more than conscious decision-making, resulting in a more honest and sometimes visceral painting. Numerous iterations, obliterations and re-works have become an important part of the process, as are the shifting properties of the paint itself. It is with this almost primitive urge to visually explore, that the artist aims to develop a raw, painterly landscape of layered paint, which is equal in significance to the characters inhabiting that space.


The subject matter, or initial concept in the early stages of the painting process are, of utmost importance, as it is this emotional response which drives the subconscious. Then through the action of painting the subject takes a new form.


There are never conclusions drawn - but more importantly new questions revealed.




 
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I’m sure most of us have at some point played the family game of monopoly, a seemingly benign game on the face of it, but how many times have we all had to tolerate the intense one-upmanship that others see fit to unleash upon us, when they are winning?

It is perhaps this human trait, which I see as the tip of a malevolent iceberg, that I rail against, and fuels my impulse to paint. My art is rooted in empathy for the underdog and the repressed, it is an exploration of how and why I feel compelled to connect with this group, and indeed the audience, through the process of painting.

I am first drawn to found images of people with whom I feel an emotional affinity. By then responding instinctively through a rapid, gestural painting process, I aim to create a more honest, expressive and sometimes visceral new form. I am fascinated by the resulting unconscious application of paint, and it’s own abstract quality, which is equal in significance to the figures inhabiting that space.

A collector last year visited a show, she was immediately drawn to a large, frenetically gestural portrait I had recently finished. Silently, there she stood, gazing at the drippy painted surface. Her face first became red, followed by tears, floods of tears. This response is what makes my job totally worthwhile, and why I continue to paint - emotional connection!

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Tim Fawcett - Painter - Galerie d'art de Francony



Selected Recent Exhibitions:


- Dynamite Gallery Brighton - Group show, 2018
- Solo show “Life is Modern Rubbish” Jackhouse Gallery 2017
- Camaver Kunsthaus, Italy, 2017
- Affordable Art Fair Battersea, London 2017
- DMH Stallard London, Group show 2016
- Ink-d Gallery Group show 2016
- Shortlisted for National Open Art Competition 2016
- Art for Syria Auction donation 2016
- Big Heart Charity Auction donation 2016
- Galerie de Francony – Selected works, 2015
- King’s Hill Gallery, Kent, UK, 2015
- DMH Stallard, Gatwick, UK, 2015
- Ink-d gallery - summer 2015
- Spring Show Jeffrey Meier Gallery New Jersey May 2015
- Phoenix Gallery Brighton "A3" group show & auction 10/14
- Phoenix Open Studios  8-16/11/14 
- Ink-d Gallery Brighton 13/06/-13/07/14 "Pushing Paint"
- Redroaster Solo Exhibition summer 2013
- Affordable Art Fair - Battersea, London (Spring 2013)
- JAG Gallery –Brighton (Resident Artist 2012/13)
- Affordable Art Fair - Hampstead, London(Autumn 2012)
- Affordable Art Fair - Battersea, London(March 2012)
- Lilford Gallery, Canterbury
- Ink-D gallery Brighton (current)
- No Walls Gallery
- First Floor 2 Gallery
- Brighton Art Fair
- Brighton Festival, Five Ways GuestArtist
- Brighton Festival, Roundels &Scoundrels
- Worthing Museum & Gallery
- Horsham Museum
- Toovey’s Contemporary Art Auction
- Art House Emsworth
- Ceolfrith Gallery Sunderland





Artist Interview by Laura Gomez for The klassikmagazine
(http://www.klassikmagazine.com/tim-fawcett/)


Name: Tim Fawcett


Age: 56


College: Brighton University, PGCE (Art & Design); Sunderland Polytechnic, BA (Fine Art); Cambridge College of Arts and Technology, Art Foundation Diploma.


How would you define yourself as an artist?
I am constantly exploring new methods of reflecting the world around me, with a strong desire to express and communicate this visually any way I can. This in turn hopefully defines who I am as a human being, in an ever-changing society, but more importantly challenges the viewer to consider their own world view.


What experience of your life would you say that is reflected in your works of art ..
My experience of life in general is reflected in my work, however to sum up, I would say that I have a desire to highlight and challenge inequalities globally and locally as a life-long socialist.


Why are you an artist, and when did you first become one?
I am an artist simply because I have a lot left to say, and the best way I can “say it”, is with paint on canvas. It’s impossible to say when I became an artist, how do you define “artist” anyway?! Art and music were always the two areas I excelled in at school, and so I never really stopped learning. I hadn’t considered myself an artist until I studied fine Art at college and learned of some incredible artists who also had so much to say in paint, sculpture, photography, print and performance, all of which can engender an incredibly powerful voice.


What art do you most identify with?
This constantly evolves and changes, as I am always discovering new artists. I always had a soft spot for figurative expressionism, and artists such as Munch and Bacon and their exploration of the personal “darkness”. The natural progression then became an interest in Dumas, Doig, Tuymans, Cecily Brown et al. More recently I identify with Cindy Sherman’s amazing self-portrait photos, and expressive German painters such as Baselitz, Oehlen and Kippenberger. Thomas Hirschhorn is also a huge influence, there are just too many to mention!


What themes do you pursue?
Inequality, mental health, discrimination, war, poverty, power and corruption.


What inspires you to work?
Political bands form the 1970s and 80s, other artists, a fascination with how western society represents its self, outwardly through photographic saturation, on social media. By examining similarities with the glossy media representation, of modern culture, and aspiring celebrity, I am interested in how this affects society’s view of its self, especially its negative impact on the human condition.


For how long have been in art? How did you start?
Always, however I was employed as a commercial artist in video games industry, which although went against the grain with me, it did provide a roof over our heads and food in the fridge for a number of years until I couldn’t take the lack of self-expression any longer.


Would you tell us some things about yourself?
I have been susceptible to anxiety and depression, though without this I feel I would be a less potent painter.


Where do you find inspiration?
Vintage photos and magazines, music, world news and picture research on the internet, people watching in the street and talking with other artists about their practice.


What are you trying to communicate with your art?
To strike a chord with the audience, to engage and provoke thought, discussion, debate and to question their position as world citizens.


And what is your personal aim as an artist?
To engage with as many people as possible to prompt thought about the wider picture and the world outside their window.


Why do you do … what you do?
Deep down I feel it is of utmost importance, almost a duty, to express how I feel and to connect with others the best way I can in a world that is so messed up!


What does “being creative” mean to you?
Being creative to me is more about exploring a meaningful theme and then translating, reflecting and challenging others in an original way. I value creativity that is intelligent, nonconformist, and is tackled with courage and persistence.


Any shows, galleries, or publications where our readers can find your work?
Jack House Gallery, Saatchiart.com, Gallerie de Francony


How do you cultivate a collector base?
Social media, particularly Instagram


Which is your most cherished piece?
“Work out” see below…


Should art be funded? Why?
Yes – absolutely! There is so much talent out there that could enrich so many people’s lives! If only it could be more accessible, and so many artists could produce so much more and higher quality work, if they could only afford the time and materials and space to do so.


What famous artists have influenced you, and how? See above…


What other interests do you have outside of art?
I am also a musician and songwriter when I have spare time. Independent movies is also a passion of mine, …not time for much else!


You seem to be very aware of the history of works. Where do you see films, photo exhibitions, art perfomances today?
All of the above can be inspiring and I consider perfectly and equally valid forms of art, there are many artists exploring new visual languages and pushing the boundaries, I can hardly wait to see what comes next!


What do you see as the strengths of your pieces, visually or conceptually?
My aim is to make art which works on many levels, including conceptually. By transforming an initial concept in a fluid and spontaneous way, I aim to bring honesty and originality to the viewer.


What aspect of your work do you pay particular attention to?
Initial concept and online research can take days before applying paint to a canvas which may take just a few hours.


What role does the artist have in society?
To reflect and challenge, to provoke thought and exploration of ideas through a visual language.


What is your most treasured memory?
The birth of my two daughters


What for you is the most enjoyable part of your art?
People responding to it, positively or negatively!


Some short questions now:


Colours: I enjoy working with a limited pallet


Textures: I love the seductiveness of working with gloss and enamel paint


Define your art: Socio-political, figurative painting


Describe your style: “Define yourself”… I wouldn’t like to think I had one particular style, as I enjoy exploring a variety of techniques


Prizes: Runner up in National Open Art competition 2017


Art Fairs: The Affordable Art fair Battersea, London two years running Brighton art fair, two years running


Museums: Group Exhibition at Worthing Museum, UK


How would your life change if you were no longer allowed to create art?
Just the thought makes me feel ill!


What do you think about the art community and market?
I guess the art community around the world has grown closer together through social media. I love talking with other artists around the world which has become much smaller as a result. The same goes for the art market. My paintings have been collected all over Europe, the US, Middle East and Australia, thanks to the internet!


Which of your projects has given you the most satisfaction?
“Modern Life is Rubbish!” which became a solo exhibition with Jack House Gallery in the UK, a series of paintings portraying intoxicated business men, painted on chintz curtain (drapes) fabric.


Who are the writer’s you admire the most?
Irvine Welsh, Ian Banks, Lorenzo Carcaterra


What about architects and designers?
There are some amazing Architects and designers, changing people’s perceptions of how our built environments can have such positive effects on the way we live and feel.


What else are you working on at the moment? Next projects?
I am currently exploring Gender stereotypes, and interested in the culture of the Drag Artist.


Define ‘Klassik International’ for the audience? Stunning.





- Tell us a bit about yourself

I graduated with a B.A.(Hons) Degree in Fine Art 1984 in North of England, (Sunderland), and moved to Brighton on the south coast that year, where I have lived and worked ever since. I trained for a while as Teacher of Art & Design and am fortunate to have been employed in visual design industries, such as Video Games, Simulation and Architecture. As my two children grew up and became increasingly independent, (now in their twenties) I was able to increase my painting practice from home. I now paint practically full time from my converted garage in Brighton.

- What inspires your art? Who inspires your art?

I have always been inspired by the work of Edvard Munch and Francis Bacon. The need to make art is driven by my need to express emotion, in a society which tends to show a superficial façade devoid of unease, anxiety or pain.
My practice also aims to challenge the false optimism of commercial society and how it represents itself, outwardly through photographic saturation, and on social media.

By examining similarities with the “glossy” media representation of modern culture, and aspiring celebrity, I am interested in how this affects society’s view of itself, especially its negative impact on the human condition.
The subject matter, often taken from vintage photographic images, in the early stages of the painting process are, of utmost importance, as it is this emotional response which drives the subconscious. Then through the action of painting the subject takes a new form.

- Tell us about your working process.

My painting process is normally an indirect and fluid “journey”, relying on instinct and spontaneity rather than conscious decision-making, resulting in a more honest and sometimes visceral painting.

My aim is always to apply paint as quickly and directly as possible to capture the essence of the subject matter. Equally important are the shifting properties of the paint itself. It is with this almost primitive urge to visually explore, that the I aim to develop a raw, painterly “landscaped” surface, combining loosely washed and sometimes contrasting, heavily layered gestural marks. This is equal in significance to the characters inhabiting that space.

There are never conclusions drawn - but more importantly new questions revealed to the viewer.

- What do you do in your spare time?

Spare time? What’s that?!! When not painting, I am being climbed upon by my step children, or occasionally meet friends over a glass of wine, or attend music concerts or galleries. I am also a performing musician with a band, I have been with for twenty five years.

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